Reading the Russians

I was learning something from the painting of Cezanne that made writing simple true sentences far from enough to make the stories have the dimensions that I was trying to put in them.
I was learning very much from him but I was not articulate enough to explain it to anyone.
Besides it was a secret.

-Hemingway, “A Moveable Feast”

I was learning something from the painting of Cezanne that made writing simple true sentences far from enough to make the stories have the dimensions that I was trying to put in them.

I was learning very much from him but I was not articulate enough to explain it to anyone.

Besides it was a secret.

-Hemingway, “A Moveable Feast”

millionsmillions:

It will take you longer to read this post and click through to its attached link than it would for you to simply read Anton Chekhov’s shortest-ever short story in its entirety.


I’m always meaning to read more Chekhov…

millionsmillions:

It will take you longer to read this post and click through to its attached link than it would for you to simply read Anton Chekhov’s shortest-ever short story in its entirety.


I’m always meaning to read more Chekhov…

(Source: millionsmillions)

All novels are about certain minorities: the individual is a minority. The universal in the novel—and isn’t that what we’re all clamoring for these days?—is reached only through the depiction of the specific man in a specific circumstance.

"He had a high opinion of his own insight, a weakness excusable in him as he was fifty, an age in which a clever man of the world of established position can hardly help taking himself rather seriously."
- Dostoyevski, speaking of Miusov, The Brothers Karamozov.

"He had a high opinion of his own insight, a weakness excusable in him as he was fifty, an age in which a clever man of the world of established position can hardly help taking himself rather seriously."

- Dostoyevski, speaking of Miusov, The Brothers Karamozov.

I don’t adopt anyone’s ideas. I have my own.

Evegny Vasiliech Bazarov, from Fathers and Sons by Ivan Turgenev (via cinncinatus)

Bazarov is a very interesting character to me. We are nothing alike - my personal philosophy is about as far away from nihilism as you can get - but I’ve always felt like we would get along well.

(Source: zossimas)


“It is amazing how complete is the delusion that beauty is goodness.”-Leo Tolstoy, The Kruetzer Sonata

“It is amazing how complete is the delusion that beauty is goodness.”-Leo Tolstoy, The Kruetzer Sonata

(Source: thewhitenotebook)

Tolstoy or Dostoyevsky? Eight Experts on Who’s Greater
I just read this article on The Millions (can’t get enough of that place). I love both, but if I had to pick, it would be Tolstoy for me every time. I thought this line was particularly true:
 ”Tolstoy’s novels are unique in the way they’re constructed entirely out of short, perfect, easy-to-read scenes, and in the way those scenes build on one another until they address the most complex issues in a nonchalant, natural way.”


Tolstoy or Dostoyevsky? Eight Experts on Who’s Greater

I just read this article on The Millions (can’t get enough of that place). I love both, but if I had to pick, it would be Tolstoy for me every time. I thought this line was particularly true:

 ”Tolstoy’s novels are unique in the way they’re constructed entirely out of short, perfect, easy-to-read scenes, and in the way those scenes build on one another until they address the most complex issues in a nonchalant, natural way.”

(Source: millionsmillions)

War and Peace: The Effects of Great Art on an Ordinary Life

War and Peace struck me so strongly that, upon finishing, I desperately needed to talk to someone about it. I found this article from The Millions (linked in the title above), and in it the author perfectly articulated the way it felt to read War and Peace, and why I am compulsed to read in the first place:

"In the end, though, the reason I read novels is not because I can talk about them with other people, or because I’m looking for ideas to explain the world.  I read them for the pure aesthetic moment that comes from seeing life perfectly distilled into words."

I am still shocked by the perfect distillation of life I find when reading War and Peace.